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Lecture: Lisa King, “Listening for the Stories: Indigenous Sovereignties and Self-Representation in a Museum Space”

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Date/Time
Date(s) - 09/12/2017
6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Location
McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture

Categories


Join the McClung Museum as Dr. Lisa King, Assistant Professor in the Department of English, University of Tennessee, gives a lecture on Native American self-representation in the museum space as part of exhibition programming associated with Northwest Coast Art: A Community of Tradition.

Museums and cultural centers are part of the fabric of our public lives, and sites we often take for granted as purveyors of neutral fact and history. However, museums themselves are cultural institutions with their own rhetorical orientations that frame their work. Based on a decade of research and work with Native American and Indigenous museums and cultural centers, in this talk Dr. King discusses the ramifications of this cultural and rhetorical framing for Native American and Indigenous peoples. Using examples from her documentation of the development of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (Washington D.C.), Haskell Indian Nations University’s Museum and Cultural Center, and the Saginaw Chippewa’s Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture & Lifeways, she examines the importance of Native/Indigenous voices in shaping museum narratives, the significance of self-representation for Native/Indigenous communities, and how visitors can better attune themselves to listening for these crucial stories.

Dr. King’s research focuses on contemporary Native American and Indigenous rhetorics, visual rhetorics, and material rhetorics, specifically on the rhetorics of cross-cultural sites such as Indigenous museums and cultural centers. Her new book, Legible Sovereignties: Rhetoric, Representations, and Native American Museums, is forthcoming from Oregon State University Press in Fall 2017.

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